Seok-Hee Cho

Developmental Giftedness: A Lens for Identifying and Nurturing Under-represented Gifted Children

Abstract

Under-represented gifted children, including English learners, children from economically disadvantaged or multi-cultural families, twice exceptional children and girls in STEM, need to be recognized, expected high and get differentiated instruction in order to develop their potential to the maximum extent. They require a new perspective on giftedness: Developmental giftedness. Preparatory program in which their high potential can be developed through exposure to rich learning environment needs to be developed and provided. So that they can join the mainstream gifted education programs. Preparatory program need to be designed differently from typical gifted education program in terms of identification of giftedness, challenges, and scaffolding for their learning. Definition of developmental giftedness, identification methods, and preparatory programs will be reviewed in this presentation.

Biographic Sketch

Dr. Seokhee Cho is a Professor, Department of Administrative and Instructional Leadership, School of Education, St. John’s University, New York. She has received her Ph.D. in educational psychology at the University of Alberta, Canada. She was a Fulbright visiting scholar at the University of Connecticut and worked with Dr. Renzulli. She is also the Director of the Center for Creativity and Gifted Education. She has been the President of Asia Pacific Federation of World Council for Gifted Children in 2004-2006, Member of the Presidential Advisory Committee for Educational Innovation in South Korea in 2005-2006, Director General of National Research Center for Gifted Education in 1986-2005. As a Principal Investigator, she has been conducting Project HOPE, Project TEAMS-New York, and Project BRIDGE funded by the Jacob K. Javits Gifted and Talented Students Education Program of the US Department of Education since 2009. These projects share common goals of recognizing under-represented gifted students, expect high and provide differentiated instruction with challenge and support for them. She has widely published scholarly articles and books on gifted education and creativity in STEM field. She serves on the Editorial Boards of seven education journals including Gifted Child Quarterly.

Rena F. Subotnik

Meeting Creative and Ethical Goals Using Psychosocial Skills and Insider Knowledge

Abstract

Research indicates that individuals who become outstanding performers and producers have more than just raw talent in the domain, or opportunities to develop their talent—they have the will, drive, and focus to take advantage of opportunities they are presented with and the capacity to persist though failures even as the bar for success gets higher. We also know that those who have access to insider knowledge (knowing how to play the “game,” have connections to the best teachers and programs) are more advantaged in talent development. All along the talent trajectory, there are opportunities to make ethical decisions about opportunities, psychosocial skills, and insider knowledge. These decisions can be made without compromising success, and in fact can fortify the respect and admiration that are gained by virtue of making these ethical choices.

Biographic Sketch

Rena F. Subotnik PhD is Director of the Center for Psychology in Schools and Education at the American Psychological Association. The Center promotes high quality application of psychology to programs and policies for schools and education. One of the Center’s missions is to generate public awareness, advocacy, clinical applications, and cutting-edge research ideas that enhance the achievement and performance of children and adolescents with gifts and talents in all domains. She has been supported in this work by the National Science Foundation, the American Psychological Foundation, and the Association for Psychological Science, the Dreyfus Foundation, and the Jack Kent Cooke Foundation. Before she came to the American Psychological Association, Dr. Subotnik was a Professor of Educational Psychology at Hunter College in New York City, and Research Coordinator for the Hunter College Campus Schools (K-12 laboratory school for 1600 gifted children). She was awarded the 2019 A. Harry Passow International Award for Leadership in Gifted Education by the World Council for Gifted and Talented Children.

David Yun Dai

After Einstein, Then What? How We View Human Potential Now and What It Means to Gifted and Talented Education

Abstract

Assumptions of human potential are deeply entrenched in our natural language, often under the guise of such terms as giftedness, prodigy, talent, expertise, and creativity, which we use to describe various forms of excellence and extraordinary performance. What have changed since Francis Galton argued that nature prevails over nurture? In this presentation, I review the evolution of thinking about human potential for more than a century by leading scholars and scientists in the world. I conclude that current views of human potential are more pluralistic, dynamic, and developmental than what was typical in the last century. I argue that, in the face of 21st century opportunities and challenges, a paradigm shift is needed to make gifted and talented education scientifically more compelling, socially more equitable, and educationally more productive.

Biographic Sketch

David Yun Dai, Ph.D., is Professor of Educational Psychology and Methodology at University at Albany, State University of New York. Dr. Dai received his doctoral degree in psychology from Purdue University, and worked as a post-doctoral fellow at the National Research Center on the Gifted and Talented, University of Connecticut. Dr. Dai was the recipient of the Early Scholar Award in 2006 and Distinguished Scholar in 2017 conferred by the National Association for Gifted Children (NAGC) in the United States. He was a Fulbright Scholar twice, to China during 2008-2009, and to Germany during 2015-2016. He currently serves on the editorial boards of Gifted Child Quarterly, Journal for the Education of the Gifted, Roeper Review, and Academic Journal of Special Education (Taiwan). He has published nine authored and edited books and over 100 journal articles, book chapters, encyclopedia entries, and book reviews in general psychology, educational psychology, and gifted and talented education. Dr. Dai’s current research focuses on talent development and creativity.

Kirsi Anne Helena Tirri

Educating ethical minds in gifted education

Abstract

My presentation is motivated by the effort to improve teaching and learning in gifted education for the twenty-first century, which sets new expectations for competencies to be learned such as ethical sensitivity and creativity. Ethical sensitivity is identified as a necessary skill for gifted students to identify and solve ethical dilemmas in caring and communicative ways. Case studies on gifted science students and researchers are presented to demonstrate the nature of ethics needed in scientific studies and work. In gifted education both teachers and students should agree on the goals and aims of education to help students find purpose in their studies and for their future. “The hacker work ethic” is introduced as an ethic that suit to the gifted and creative minds to help them to find purpose in their lives and to combine ethics with creativity.

Biographic Sketch

Dr. Kirsi Tirri is a Full Professor of Education and a Research Director at the Helsinki Collegium for Advanced Studies and the Department of Education at the University of Helsinki. She is also a Visiting Professor at St. John’s University, New York, USA. Tirri has been the President of ECHA (European Council for High Ability) for the years 2008-2012, the President of the SIG International Studies at AERA (American Educational Research Association) for the years 2010-2013 and the President of the Finnish Academy of Science and Letters for the years 2016-2017. Her research interests include school pedagogy, moral and religious education, talent development and gifted education, teacher education and cross-cultural studies. She has published 12 monographs and numerous journal articles related to these fields. She serves in 13 Editorial Boards of educational journals. She has supervised 22 doctoral dissertations in education and theology and mentored many postdoctoral students who are now professors and researchers in education.